Antonio Brown is a transcendent talent. He has been a staple of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ offense since 2011, and has the trajectory of a Hall of Fame player.

But he clearly isn’t happy.  And it’s also apparent that his lack of faith in the Steelers organization is irreconcilable.

A video clip from HBO’s “The Shop” affirms this, as Brown expresses his frustrations to Anthony Davis, Lebron James, Jamie Foxx, and rapper Meek Mill.

Pretty eye-opening isn’t it? But what are the next steps?

Clearly the Steelers can’t bring Brown back to the organization. In fact, it was pretty much posted on a marquee after a face-to-face meeting between Brown and Steelers Owner Art Rooney. After their meeting on February 19th, it was declared that the receiver was allowed to pursue other options via trade.

Considering his pedigree, you would assume that suitors would be lining at the door to hear the price tag of this star receiver.

But according to a post by Adam Schefter late Friday evening, three teams are out front in the Antonio Brown Sweepstakes: The Oakland Raiders, Washington Redskins, and Tennessee Titans.

The debate on whether to trade for Brown is a provocative one. His talent is irrefutable. For six-straight seasons, Brown’s floor has been 101 receptions and 1,284 yards. But he also carries a hefty price tag, considering he has three years left on a 5-year/72.7 million dollar extension. He also turns 31 in July.

Considering the link to the Redskins, the Staff Writers at Full Press Coverage Redskins got together for a round table discussion to share their thoughts.

“Should The Redskins Make a Trade For Antonio Brown?”

Alan Lepore (@AlanLepore):  No. We would be in cap hell for the next couple of years adding a $22M hit with an already cap-strangling Alex Smith contract. According to , in order to make it manageable without compromising the number of personnel on the team, the Redskins would need to part ways with J. Norman, Z. Brown, M. Foster, and J. Reed to just get back to where they are cap wise. There is no one on the team that can currently duplicate their production and would not be able to afford anyone in FA that can do that. In addition to the lost personnel assets, the Redskins would have to give up too much draft capital that could be used to improve an already mediocre team. Trading for AB would set back the Redskins franchise even further than where it already sits and guarantee a 5-11 season at best for 2019 AND 2020.

Ian Cummings (@ian_cummings_9): No. The Redskins are in a situation where, with lacking cap space and multiple talent deficient positions, they need to be more patient with a rebuild. Trading picks for Antonio Brown, an asset passing his prime, who accounts for over $20 million in cap space in 2019, is the epitome of impatience. It’s a move that would ultimately detract from an inevitable reset, and it should not be made.

Jack Brizendine (@JackPBrizendine): I’m gonna make this as simple as possible: no. The Redskins should not even consider trading for Antonio Brown. It’s reported that the Steelers are asking for at least a first round pick for him. Picks are typically devalued by everyone this time of year, which is why many fans are ready to sell the farm for Brown. Don’t get me wrong, Antonio Brown would improve the team, but it’s ignorant to the larger problem. Washington has too many holes at this point to be throwing away picks for a superstar receiver who doesn’t have anybody to catch passes from. Antonio Brown also comes with a hefty price tag. A team that has roughly over twenty-two million dollars can’t drain almost all of it on one player. It’s always fun to see your team try to acquire stars, but it just isn’t realistic at this point.

George Carmi (@Gcarmi21): I’m also a no. I see the appeal of adding an elite talent to what is otherwise a toothless receiving corps. But his age, and the potential baggage that he brings, scares me. If anything, the Redskins should continue their work of building a sound structure to base the team. Our last two drafts have provided building blocks in working towards an identity. However, I still argue that the team lacks depth. When an injured player goes down, we lack any ability to fill that hole with a serviceable player. Our interior offensive line has been neglected for years, and so has our secondary. We also need to replenish our talent at Tackle and Tight End. I can’t see a situation in which giving away assets to a player over the age of 30 is a prudent one. I also can’t see a situation in which Brown himself is happy with our quarterback situation. All things considered, I think our assets, both monetary and draft selections, could be used more effectively.

 

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