NAME: Jordyn Brooks

POSITION: Linebacker

SCHOOL: Texas Tech

HEIGHT: 6’1”

WEIGHT: 245 pounds

In today’s Chiefs draft prospect profile, we will look into a multi-dimensional linebacker. He has more range than what some may anticipate playing for this Big 12 defense. Meanwhile, he has the gap shooting ability that teams covet. His ability to play in coverage is not the best in the class. This player does have a lot to offer in sub packages early in his career, though. Now, let’s get things started with our breakdown of Texas Tech’s Jordyn Brooks.

Tackling

Playing in the hyper-active Big 12 Conference has already tested Brooks in many ways. His angles and pursuit taken to get to the football is something that really surprised me (in a good way). Yes, Brooks can still have moments where he gets up the field too quickly, overrunning the play. His tackling form is outstanding. In addition, he finishes with explosion through contact. Brooks knows how to utilize his added size to an advantage. Overall, his physicality should allow for many opportunities to make plays on the ball as well.

Range/Speed

Again, very impressive in this area, given how what I saw from the beginning of his tape to the end. Texas Tech asked him to spy a lot in the middle of the field. Once he read the play and keyed in on where offenses were attacking, Brooks impressed with flashes of speed and sideline to sideline mobility. If blockers get the wires crossed, he will also make them look silly because of his short area quickness. Brooks has shown a good bit of fluidity in his hips and feet. As a result, his change of direction skills and speed allow him to recover quickly, while chasing opponents down from behind.

Taking On Blocks

This is likely the area where Brooks would need the most development or improvement in. His arms/hands activity is not totally inexistent. Nonetheless, there is a sense of Brooks getting lost in space against blockers. Either he stops his feet, cancelling out his quickness. Or, Brooks struggles to power through contact and disengage, while still in his gap. At TTU, he usually tried to beat blockers by simply just running around them. That takes him out of his gap or lane, however.

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Instincts/Football IQ

We talked a bit earlier about his read and react ability/keying in on plays. I will stress that his reads are not as anticipatory as other linebackers in this class. Brooks is essentially the definition of a see ball, go to ball type of defender. On the flip side, he does present some slipperiness to wiggle around blocks or traffic. Brooks rarely displayed much of a false step, too.

Coverage Ability

There is some positives for Brooks as a pass defender. Nonetheless, I think there are some limitations. Because of the aforementioned short area quickness, I think you need to provide him opportunities to where the ball is completed in front of him. Teams would have a fairly good chance of beating him consistently in man coverage. Brooks has that experience of playing as a spy in the middle. With plenty of movement both pre-snap and post-snap on the backend for Kansas City, Brooks could find a home slipping into the hashes or soft zones. Give Brooks chances in zone coverage, and his snaps will continue to rise.

Chiefs Fit

Jordyn Brooks has the potential to be a three down defender in the NFL. In Kansas City, he could find a home as the WILL linebacker. That is where Brooks may fit best, regardless of what team he lands on. Overall, I think his underrated speed, range and physicality will shock people. Linebackers from the Big 12 do not always get looked at in the most positive light. Nonetheless, the Chiefs would gladly take Brooks’ prowess to shoot gaps and work downhill or in short spaces.

Be on the lookout for more Chiefs offseason coverage. Included, will be our final draft prospect profiles before next week’s NFL selections. For more great sports and NFL content, stay tuned to Full Press Coverage.

– Braden Holecek is the Kansas City Chiefs managing editor for Full Press Coverage. He covers the NFL. Like and follow on //platform.twitter.com/widgets.js //platform.twitter.com/widgets.js and Facebook.

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